Apple-Berry Muesli

One of the best times of the year is berry season (strawberry, blackberry, raspberry blueberry….).  Nothing beats the taste of a fresh picked berry.  It seems to go by so fast, so I try to consume as many as possible before the season comes to an end.  This year I’ve been combining my love of berries with my new breakfast obsession: Muesli!

This recipe comes from the Oh She Glows recipe book, and I have made very few changes.  I love it because it’s quick and easy to prepare and requires minimal ingredients, which can be switched up depending on what you have on hand.  You can also make it the night before as a grab and go breakfast or snack.

Rolled oats are called for, but you can also use quick oats.  However, you will lose some of the texture using quick oats, and they have a slightly higher glycemic index, so rolled is preferred.

Ingredients:

Serves 2-4

  • 1 apple peeled and cubed
  • 1 apple peeled and grated
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1 cup yogurt of choice
  • 3 tbsp pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, hemp hearts or crushed nuts
  • 1-2 tbsp dried cranberries and/or raisins
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon or to taste
  • Your favourite fresh berries, sliced
  • Other toppings as desired

Directions:

Mix all ingredients (except for the berries) together and put in the fridge overnight (or for at least 2 hours).  Top with berries, and any other desired toppings, and serve.

appleberry

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Nuts About Nuts!

Ok, so I love nuts. Who doesn’t…? I guess maybe those with a life-threatening allergy… If that’s you, not to worry. Although this time I’m discussing nuts, seeds have a very similar nutritional make up.

Nuts are close to the perfect food. They are tasty, good for you, require no preparation, and can be used in almost any dish, sweet or savoury. My family and I eat nuts everyday. Nuts are a very important part of a healthy diet and, unless you have an allergy, should be consumed often. I find most people do not eat enough nuts if they are even eating them at all.

Nuts are particularly important for kids. They need foods high in healthy fats to keep them going and to help with brain development, and nuts are a great source of healthy fats. They also contain protein, fibre, and vitamins and minerals. Although the exact nutritional profile differs between varieties, nuts are generally about 10-20% protein and 50-75% fats (mainly mono and polyunsaturated). They contain differing types and amounts of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients so it’s best to rotate your nuts to ensure you are getting all they have to offer.

Unfortunately, nuts have gotten a bit of a bad wrap over the last few decades due to rising numbers of allergies. For awhile, it was even recommended that you delay introducing nuts to infants to help prevent food allergies. This advice has since been found to be false and the Canadian Paediatric Society recommends not waiting to introduce nuts even if there is an increased risk of allergy. For more information on this, visit: http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/feeding_your_baby_in_the_first_year

We are also emerging from a huge ‘fat scare’ where everyone seemed to be avoiding fats like the plague. Thankfully, we seem to be getting over that as we are realizing that low fat diets actually make things worse. Fats are necessary for health and normal functioning. We need fats; the right kind of fats. Even if you are trying to lose weight and cut calories, you should not be avoiding healthy fats.

Now, I’m not saying that you should go forth and consume an entire bowl full of nuts for breakfast, lunch, and dinner everyday. I just want to get the point across that you don’t need to be afraid of nuts and, in fact, should give them a welcomed and important position in your diet amongst all the other healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables. Better yet, use them to bump out some unhealthy foods. Because nuts are high in fats and proteins, they give you more energy and keep you feeling satisfied longer as compared to a sugary snack.

Nuts Pic

Here are things to keep in mind when purchasing and storing nuts:

  • Buy your nuts raw, and not roasted. Exposing nuts to high heat strips them of some of their health benefits. The unsaturated fats become rancid and some of the vitamins and minerals can be depleted. Buying shelled nuts is even better, but not as convenient.
  • Store your nuts in the fridge. Unsaturated fats are sensitive to heat and light. Keeping them in a cool, dark place keeps them fresh for longer.
  • When buying nut butters, be sure to check the ingredients. Typical store bought nut butters are loaded with sugars and trans fats. Check the label to make sure the only ingredient is nuts.
  • Nuts can sometimes be a bit hard to digest. Try soaking them for 4-6 hours or overnight. They become softer and, some think, easier to digest.

Easy ways to include nuts in your diet:

  • Plain straight up nuts. Not tempting enough?  Try adding some dried fruit (… and perhaps a few dark chocolate or unsweetened carob chips) to make a trail mix.
  • Nut butters (natural nut butters with no added ingredients) spread on crackers, bread, celery (ants on a log anyone?), apples, etc.
  • Sprinkle nuts on a salad.
  • Try a nut inspired recipe like this Asian Cashew Quinoa Salad.
  • Add ground or whole nuts to your oatmeal or hot cereal. Chia and hemp seeds are great for this too.
  • Add nuts or nut butters to a smoothie.
  • Use different kinds of nuts to make pestos to use on pasta, meat, or as a spread or dip.
  • Grind nuts and use the powder to coat slippery fruits like banana and melon. On top of adding a nutritional punch it also makes them easier for little ones to pick up. Just pop nuts in a food processor, magic bullet, blender, or coffee grinder and pulse until nuts are ground into a powder.
  • Mix ground nuts in baby food purees or cereals.
  • Add ground or whole nuts to yogurt.

Important Note:

Whole nuts and large dollops of nut butters can be choking hazards for children. Grinding nuts and sprinkling them on cereals, fruits, or adding them to smoothies is your best bet to avoid this risk. When using nut butters, spread thinly and avoid globs.   When children are old enough to begin eating whole nuts, try soaking them to soften them up and ensure the pieces are not big enough to block an airway. Here is some additional information on choking hazards: http://www.cps.ca/documents/position/preventing-choking-suffocation-children

Strawberry Kiwi Popsicles

The summer of popsicles continues! Here is another delish popsicle recipe.  This one is loaded with fruit and chia seeds, which not only add some omega-3’s and extra fibre, but also makes the mixture more gelatinous and prevents all the kiwi and strawberry seeds from settling.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups seedless watermelon, chopped
  • 2-3 kiwis (depending on size)
  • 8-10 medium sized strawberries
  • 1 ½ tbsp chia seeds

Directions:

  1. Put ingredients into a food processor or blender and blend well
  2. Pour mixture into popsicle mould and freeze for at least 5 hours
  3. Enjoy!

Jameson Popsicle

 

Nicholas’s buddy Jameson enjoying a nice cold Strawberry Kiwi Popsicle.  Proof that there are other kids out there who enjoy my creations.

Asian Cashew (or Peanut) Quinoa Salad

I have made this particular recipe about 6 or 7 times over the past month alone.  I’ve eaten it as a side dish and as a main course. I’ve taken it to BBQs and even used it as payment for babysitting (at the sitter’s request).  It’s a hit every time, and I usually get asked for the recipe.  So I finally came to the conclusion that I needed to share this incredible find on my blog.  Plus, what healthy eating blog would be complete without a quinoa salad recipe?  This is sure to be the most delicious cliché you have ever put in your mouth.

I found this little treasure while pursuing a remedy to a craving for an Asian inspired quinoa salad.  This is the way I find 80% of my recipes; I have something in my head that I want to make (or ingredients in my fridge that I want to use), and I look for a recipe that fits the description.  I found this one on vegangela.com and it definitely hit the spot.  I love the fresh taste of cilantro, and most recipes don’t have enough for me, but I, surprisingly, didn’t have to change the measurement this time.  In fact, I didn’t really change this recipe much at all.  It’s creamy, nutty, fresh, and crunchy all at the same time.  Perfect!

Nicholas doesn’t really like the chunks of cabbage but loves the flavour, so I always take out a scoop for him before I add it. While I have made both the cashew and peanut versions, I prefer the cashew version, as it’s a bit of a lighter flavour, but the peanut version is still divine.

From a nutritional perspective, this salad has it all; a rainbow of phytonutrients, healthy fats, and enough plant-based protein to make this a main course option.  For an even bigger protein punch, add some shelled edamame, tofu, or shredded chicken.

 Asian Quinoa Salad

Asian Cashew (or Peanut) Quinoa Salad

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup quinoa rinsed
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups finely cut purple cabbage
  • 1 cup finely shredded carrots
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup chopped fresh coriander
  • ½ cup crushed raw cashews (or peanuts)
  • Optional (for extra protein): ½ cup shelled and steamed edamame, shredded chicken, or tofu cubes quickly sautéed in olive oil and tamari

Dressing:

  • ¼ cup natural cashew butter (or peanut butter)
  • 2 cloves garlic pressed or minced
  • 1 tbsp fresh grated ginger (or 1 tsp dried)
  • 2 ½ tbsp tamari (or soy sauce)
  • 1 ½ tbsp maple syrup (or agave)
  • 2 ½ tbsp warm water
  • 1 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil

Instructions

  1. Bring 2 cups water to a boil.  Add quinoa, stir, bring back to a boil, and then reduce to the lowest heat setting.  Simmer until the water is completely absorbed and the quinoa is fluffy – about 20 mins. *Alternatively, you can cook your quinoa in your rice cooker as you would rice.  You need to keep an eye on it though, as it tends to cook a bit faster than rice.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together.
  3. Add the quinoa to the dressing and mix well to combine.
  4. Add the veggies, onions, cilantro, nuts, and edamame/chicken/tofu if using.

 

Hope you enjoy this as much as I do!

Here is a link to the recipe on vegangela.com:

http://vegangela.com/2013/09/27/asian-cashew-quinoa-salad/